Fall 2015
Volume 4, Issue 4

“DOC NO MORE?”

Conviction of Murder and Tampering with Physical Evidence License Surrender. The physician admitted guilt to the charge of having been convicted in the County Court, Onondaga County, New York of Murder in the second degree and Tampering with Physical Evidence. 


IN OTHER NEWS...

Abusing Patients and Engaging In Conduct Which Evidences Moral Unfitness; Gross Negligence; Negligence on More Than One Occasion; Gross Incompetence; Incompetence on More Than One Occasion and Failure to Maintain Records Censure and reprimand and $2,500 fine. The physician must comply with the terms of the Illinois Board order, and the physician must provide ninety (90) days notice before practicing medicine in New York State or in any other jurisdiction where the practice of medicine is predicated on his New York State medical license after which his practice may be subject to conditions. The physician did not contest the charge of having been disciplined by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation for allegations of prescribing medications via the internet without maintaining patient records. 

Accepting Bribes License Surrender. The physician admitted guilt to the charge of having been convicted in the United States District Court, District of New Jersey of accepting bribes. On or about May 5, 2015, physician pleaded guilty to one count of accepting bribes. Physician was sentenced to thirty-seven (37) months incarceration, followed by one year supervised release with special conditions including Alcohol/Drug Testing and Treatment and Mental Health Treatment, new debt restrictions, and $100 court assessed fine.

Negligence on More Than One Occasion; Lack of Informed Consent from Patient and Failing to Maintain Accurate Records  License Surrender. The physician admitted guilt to the charge of having been disciplined by the Florida State Board of Medicine for failing to practice medicine with the appropriate level of care, skill and treatment. 

Practicing Medicine While Impaired by Physical Disability and Mental Disability; Having a Psychiatric Condition Which Impairs the Physician’s Ability to Practice Medicine License Surrender. The physician did not contest the charge of having been disciplined by the California State Medical Board for practicing the profession while impaired by a mental or physical illness. Physician was deemed unfit to practice medicine.

Practicing the Profession Fraudulently or Beyond Its Authorized Scope; Negligence on More Than One Occasion and Failing to Maintain Accurate Records License Revocation. The Hearing Committee sustained the charges finding the physician guilty of having been disciplined by the Texas State Medical Board for negligence on more than one occasion and failing to maintain adequate patient records. The Texas Board based its findings on physician’s conduct in failing to properly evaluate and supervise mid-level or physician assistant providers in their rendering of care to pain management patients while working at pain management clinics. The Texas Board concluded that it was the physician’s responsibility to evaluate and supervise the performance of these providers. In reviewing medical records pertaining to patients of the clinic, which were maintained by the physician assistant while under the supervision of the physician, the medical board found that they failed to demonstrate treatment rationales indicating sound clinical judgment. The Texas Board’s specific findings include the physician assistant’s failure to discuss or obtain from patients essential information relevant to care and treatment including appropriate medical histories, rationales for diagnosis involving chronic pain and alternative treatment modalities. The findings further include failure of performing physical examinations on patients, failure to discuss treatment plans or discuss with patients the risks and benefits of proposed treatments. Previously on June 20, 2013 the physician’s New York State medical license was summarily suspended by the New York State Commissioner of Health.

Negligence on More Than One Occasion; Moral Unfitness; Abuse of a Patient and Sexual Physical Contact with a Patient by a Psychiatrist License Revocation. The Hearing Committee sustained the charges finding the physician guilty of having been disciplined by the Wisconsin State Medical Examining Board for allegations of engaging in inappropriate sexual contact with a patient, including sexual conduct during psychiatric treatment. 


THE PHYSICIAN ADVOCACY PROGRAM®
Far too few physicians are aware of the overwhelming weight that would befall them if targeted by the OPMC. For OPMC Protection go toThePAP.com